a.k.a. Lacey and Adam make their friends and family jealous :)

Washington

The Big Loop: Cities

The focus of the trip was definitely on the natural wonders, but we happened across a few funky cities along the way.

After a time consuming border crossing, Seattle was a welcome surprise. In the space of an afternoon, we managed to cram in:

  • Pike Place Public Market – famous for the hustle and bustle of its seafood sellers and as the home to the original Starbucks (no, we didn’t partake – the queue was out the door and across the street!
  • Space Needle – offers a brilliant view of the city, and all the more special when Mt Rainier looks like its floating!
  • The Sculpture Park on the foreshore – pretty impressive, even to a bunch of heathens like us

SEATTLE FROM THE NEEDLE

FEELING FISHY, PIKE PLACE MARKETS

SCULPTURE OF A DOG... WE THINK.

I liked it so much, I’m going back in a few weeks to catch up with some ex-pats! Definitely worth a visit.

No trip along the west coast would be complete without a stop in San Francisco. China Town and the botanical gardens were high on the list, but most impressive was the Golden Gate Bridge:

CROSSING THE BRIDGE

GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE, SAN FRANCISCO

You know you’re in the tree-hugging hippie state when leave the redwoods to discover they’ve been replaced with their metal brethren:

WIND FARM, CALIFORNIA

On the home stretch we stopped in Las Vegas as our launching pad (literally – Jeneen and Mario took a helicopter ride from there) to the Grand Canyon. From the Stratosphere and away from the noise, Las Vegas actually looks quite pretty:

GLITZ AND GLAMOUR - VIVA LAS VEGAS!

And of course, admiring the Bellagio water fountains was a great excuse to partake of the Bellagio buffet… again 🙂

BELLAGIO WATER SHOW


The Big Loop: Moving Water

Travelling in June/July has distinct advantages – warmer weather, open roads, awake animals and the benefit of the melt: copiously flowing waterfalls and rivers. Then there’s the stuff that water carves in its path – canyons, valleys and other curious rock formations that need to be seen to be believed.

The goosenecks at Dead Horse State Park in Utah were the first insight into what the desert hides. These winding waterways carve a giant snake into the land.

DEAD HORSE STATE PARK

Then there’s the rocks that get left behind, only to slowly weather away in the wind and heat.

ADAM AT CANYONLANDS

Some of the structures are so extraordinary they seem man-made. The Double Arches do not seem like something that could be formed naturally. You can almost imagine a giant holding a chisel, shaping the rock into this spectacular formation.

DOUBLE ARCH, ARCHES NATIONAL PARK

Yellowstone was a direct contrast to the deserts we travelled – instead of cutting deeper and soaking into the ground, water here shoots up into the sky from the sheer pressure caused by heat.

OLD FAITHFUL, YELLOWSTONE

GEYSER AT YELLOWSTONE

St Mary Falls is at the end of a short walk in Glacier National Park. Not huge, but the area is so peaceful and so obviously natural that it was a special experience.

ST MARY FALLS, GLACIER NATIONAL PARK

Marble Canyon is on the road through the Kootenays and carves a deep groove into the rock. This is the head of the canyon, where the water barely cuts a groove. Further down, the canyon is dozens of metres deep and funnels the water into a raging torrent.

MARBLE CANYON, KOOTENAY ROAD

Athabasca Glacier on the Icefields Parkway offers a chance to walk on ice. Buses on giant tyres traverse a 30% gradient (you should have seen Jeneen’s white knuckles on that leg!) to drop you in the middle of the flow. It’s a cold and awe-inspiring experience.

ATHASBASCA GLACIER, COLUMBIA ICEFIELDS

Slightly warmer, much smaller, but just as special was Tangle Creek. The map clearly states ‘Watch out for goats!’ – for once, the maps were right.

TANGLE CREEK FALLS

The Athabasca Falls are several miles from the Glacier, but the roar was loud enough I reckon it would carry to its origin.

ATHABASCA FALLS

Not sure of the name of this cute little falls, but was so impressed with Adam’s photography I just had to include it…

ADAM EXPERIMENTING WITH DELAYS AT MT RAINIER

You can climb to the top of Yosemite Falls, but why would you when you can see the entire cascade from ground level?

YOSEMITE FALLS

And after the magnificence of Grand Canyon, we thought Bryce would be dull. No chance!

BRYCE CANYON

Ah, so many incredible sights! We could go on forever… but we won’t 🙂


The Big Loop: Lakes and Mountains

As you might expect with any trip through the Rockies, we saw A LOT of mountains. Shock horror. Still, no matter how many you see, they continue to astound and amaze. Some of the places we visited were simply gob-smacking, especially considering the poor excuses we have for mountains in Australia.

The first big ‘uns were the Grand Tetons – all the more spectacular for seeming to rise from nowhere in the plains leading to Yellowstone.

GRAND TETONS

The Kootenays were our first exposure to the Rockies north of the USA/Canada border.

KOOTENAYS

Before launching ourselves onto the Icefields Parkway, we decided to stay at Lake Louise Hostel (great tip – thanks Sab!) to soak up the surroundings. Lake Louise was, of course, absolutely heaving with tourists of the most obnoxious kind. Adam and I left Jeneen and Mario to brave the mosquitoes around the edge of the lake and took the first path that didn’t look heavily laden with pushy people. We failed to read the signs that explained the route was 3.5 miles one way, and climbed steadily the entire time. We ascended 750 metres with aching calves, but were rewarded with this view of Lake Agnes and, thankfully, a far lower density of obnoxiousness.

LAKE AGNES, ABOVE LAKE LOUISE

LAKE LOUISE

The next day we started the Icefields Parkway. I say ‘started’ because we would drive some stretches of that road 5 times before we left the area. One of the highlights was undoubtedly Bow Lake lookout. Moraine Lake and Castle Mountain were close seconds.

BOW LAKE LOOKOUT

MORAINE LAKE

MOUNTAINS LINING THE ICEFIELDS PARKWAY

After starting Canada Day in Jasper, we made our way to Kamloops via Mt Robson. Adam patiently waited an hour for the clouds to clear and expose the peak – as you can see, the clouds simply did not cooperate. Nonetheless, it was gorgeous.

MT ROBSON

We crossed the border, thinking we’d left behind the snow and cold. Then we came to Mt Rainier National Park, just outside Seattle. Yes, those crazy Australians wearing shorts and t-shirts in the snow belong to us…

MT RAINIER

After a reasonable detour from US5, we climbed up to Crater Lake and found it was well worth the effort. Snow covered ridges with still, sapphire blue water and cool enough that half the roads were closed due to snow… in July!

CRATER LAKE

Last but not least, perhaps the most iconic location of all. This view is Yosemite Valley – Half Dome, El Capitan and Bridal Veil Falls all in one shot. Amazing.

YOSEMITE VALLEY

Amidst these incredible mountains were canyons, waterfalls, glaciers… more about them in the next post!


The Big Loop: Gone Walkabout

After a couple of warm-ups (Ouray and Santa Fe) it was time to hit the road on Tuesday 21 June for the Filipich Road Trip. Adam had been planning for weeks, and Mario and Jeneen were relishing the opportunity to see some of the diverse landscape of the States. The map below roughly shows the trip, minus meanderings, mistakes and repeats:

THE BIG LOOP

Yep, it was HUGE! Here’s the key stats:

  • 6,000+ miles (Google tells me it’s 4750 miles, so we must have done a fair bit of wandering off the track)
  • 2 cars (first one broke)
  • 2 countries
  • 15 states
  • 2 land border crossings
  • 2 public holidays (Canada Day and Independence Day)
  • 16 national parks – Yellowstone, Glacier (USA), Kootenays, Jasper, Banff, Yoho, Yosemite, Grand Canyon… the list goes on
  • 25 hotels/motels (or maybe more… they all blend into one another after a while)
  • Too many amazing sights to name (or count!)

In fact, there were so many sights we decided to split them up into 4 separate posts that follow this one, be sure to check them out:

  • Flora and Fauna
  • Lakes and Mountains
  • Moving Water
  • Cities

Here’s the stuff that didn’t fit into those posts:

MOAB SUNSET

CAR #1 - IT LASTED 3 DAYS

OUR SECOND CHARIOT - THE DODGE DURANGO

JUST LIKE THE MOVIES... RED SHEDS EVERYWHERE

BIG TREE IN CALIFORNIA

Okay, we’re exhausted just looking at these photos! It was a truly epic adventure. We farewelled Jeneen and Mario on Wednesday, and four hours later welcomed Mark – so there will be more travels to come. We promise to update the blog more promptly next time…