a.k.a. Lacey and Adam make their friends and family jealous :)

The Big Loop: Moving Water

Travelling in June/July has distinct advantages – warmer weather, open roads, awake animals and the benefit of the melt: copiously flowing waterfalls and rivers. Then there’s the stuff that water carves in its path – canyons, valleys and other curious rock formations that need to be seen to be believed.

The goosenecks at Dead Horse State Park in Utah were the first insight into what the desert hides. These winding waterways carve a giant snake into the land.

DEAD HORSE STATE PARK

Then there’s the rocks that get left behind, only to slowly weather away in the wind and heat.

ADAM AT CANYONLANDS

Some of the structures are so extraordinary they seem man-made. The Double Arches do not seem like something that could be formed naturally. You can almost imagine a giant holding a chisel, shaping the rock into this spectacular formation.

DOUBLE ARCH, ARCHES NATIONAL PARK

Yellowstone was a direct contrast to the deserts we travelled – instead of cutting deeper and soaking into the ground, water here shoots up into the sky from the sheer pressure caused by heat.

OLD FAITHFUL, YELLOWSTONE

GEYSER AT YELLOWSTONE

St Mary Falls is at the end of a short walk in Glacier National Park. Not huge, but the area is so peaceful and so obviously natural that it was a special experience.

ST MARY FALLS, GLACIER NATIONAL PARK

Marble Canyon is on the road through the Kootenays and carves a deep groove into the rock. This is the head of the canyon, where the water barely cuts a groove. Further down, the canyon is dozens of metres deep and funnels the water into a raging torrent.

MARBLE CANYON, KOOTENAY ROAD

Athabasca Glacier on the Icefields Parkway offers a chance to walk on ice. Buses on giant tyres traverse a 30% gradient (you should have seen Jeneen’s white knuckles on that leg!) to drop you in the middle of the flow. It’s a cold and awe-inspiring experience.

ATHASBASCA GLACIER, COLUMBIA ICEFIELDS

Slightly warmer, much smaller, but just as special was Tangle Creek. The map clearly states ‘Watch out for goats!’ – for once, the maps were right.

TANGLE CREEK FALLS

The Athabasca Falls are several miles from the Glacier, but the roar was loud enough I reckon it would carry to its origin.

ATHABASCA FALLS

Not sure of the name of this cute little falls, but was so impressed with Adam’s photography I just had to include it…

ADAM EXPERIMENTING WITH DELAYS AT MT RAINIER

You can climb to the top of Yosemite Falls, but why would you when you can see the entire cascade from ground level?

YOSEMITE FALLS

And after the magnificence of Grand Canyon, we thought Bryce would be dull. No chance!

BRYCE CANYON

Ah, so many incredible sights! We could go on forever… but we won’t 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s